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Compute Cloud Abstraction APIs ... who needs 'em?

This blog is about open source cloud computing libraries. Specifically, this is about libraries that abstract away differences between compute clouds such as EC2 and Rackspace. In the following blog, you'll find opinions from consultants, business founders, users of the cloud and even those who run a cloud themselves. They will tell you their opinion on the value proposition of cloud aggregation and abstraction libraries. Some mention their expectations for the future. In a follow-up, I'll discuss some of the tools these leaders mention.

Here are the commentators and their backgrounds. They are listed in order of appearance in the blog. We should all thank them for taking time out to help us understand the issue better.

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[1] Tom White http://www.lexemetech.com/
Tom works at Cloudera on the popular Map/Reduce engine: Hadoop. He's also a committer on the libcloud project.

[2] Bradford Cross http://measuringmeasures.blogspot.com/
Bradford is co-founder of Flightcaster, and founded crane: an open source cluster management project.

[3] Shlomo Swidler http://www.orchestratus.com/
Shlomo is basically "the" expert on EC2. He's also an expert on cloud ecosystems generally, deeply involved in OCCI and the popular cloud connect conference.

[4] Thorsten von Eicken http://www.voneicken.com/
Thorsten founded the most popular cloud management platform: rightscale.

[5] Peter Bryant http://rimuhosting.com/
Peter founded the compute cloud RimuHosting.

[6] Michael D Neale http://michaelneale.blogspot.com/
Mic works for RedHat on a rules-based cloud deployment project called Cooling Tower.
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READ MORE at SOURCE - CloudSlam Blog

Published Tuesday, February 16, 2010 6:48 PM by David Marshall
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