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Showing 1 - 8 of 8 white papers, page 1 of 1.
How Software-Defined Storage Enhances Hyper-converged Storage
This paper describes how to conquer the challenges of using SANs in a virtual environment and why organizations are looking into hyper-converged systems that take advantage of Software-Defined Storage as a solution to provide reliable application performance and a highly available infrastructure.
One of thefundamental requirements for virtualizing applications is shared storage.Applications can move around to different servers as long as those servers haveaccess to the storage with the application and its data. Typically, sharedstorage takes place over a storage network known as a SAN. However, SANstypically run into issues in a virtual environment, so organizations arecurrently looking for new options. Hyper-converged infrastructure is a solutionthat seems well-suited to address these issues.
 
By downloading thispaper you will:
 
  • Identify the issues with running SANs in virtualized environments
  • Learn why Hyper-converged systems are ideal for solving performance issues
  • Learn why Hyper-converged systems are ideal for remote offices
  • Discover real world use-cases where DataCore's Hyper-converged Virtual SAN faced these issues
DataCore Virtual SAN – A Deep Dive into Converged Storage
Topics: DataCore, storage, SAN
This white paper describes how DataCore’s Virtual SAN software can help you deploy a converged, flexible architecture to address painful challenges that exist today such as single points of failure, poor application performance, low storage efficiency and utilization, and high infrastructure costs.

DataCore Virtual SAN introduces the next evolution in Software-defined Storage (SDS) by creating high-performance and highly-available shared storage pools using the disks and flash storage in your servers. It addresses the requirements for fast and reliable access to storage across a cluster of servers at remote sites as well as in high-performance applications.

Download this white paper to learn about:

•    The technical aspects of DataCore’s Virtual SAN solution - a deep dive into converged storage
•    How DataCore Virtual SAN addresses IT challenges such as single points of failure, poor application performance, low storage efficiency and utilization, and high infrastructure costs.
•    Explore possible use cases and benefits of DataCore’s Virtual SAN

Building a Highly Available Data Infrastructure
Topics: DataCore, storage, SAN, HA
This white paper outlines best practices for improving overall business application availability by building a highly available data infrastructure.
Regardless of whether you use a direct attached storage array, or a network-attached storage (NAS) appliances, or a storage area network (SAN) to host your data, if this data infrastructure is not designed for high availability, then the data it stores is not highly available by extension, application availability is at risk – regardless of server clustering.

Download this paper to:
•    Learn how to develop a High Availability strategy for your applications
•    Identify the differences between Hardware and Software-defined infrastructures in terms of Availability
•    Learn how to build a Highly Available data infrastructure using Hyper-converged storage

The State of Software-Defined Storage (SDS) in 2015
Topics: DataCore, storage, SAN, SDS
For the fifth consecutive year, DataCore Software explored the impact of Software-Defined Storage (SDS) on organizations across the globe. The 2015 survey distills the expectations and experiences of 477 IT professionals that are currently using or evaluating SDS technology to solve critical data storage challenges. The results yield surprising insights from a cross-section of industries over a wide range of workloads. The survey was conducted on April, 2015.
For the fifth consecutive year, DataCore Software explored the impact of Software-Defined Storage (SDS) on organizations across the globe. The 2015 survey distills the expectations and experiences of 477 IT professionals that are currently using or evaluating SDS technology to solve critical data storage challenges. The results yield surprising insights from a cross-section of industries over a wide range of workloads. The survey was conducted on April, 2015.

Waiting on IO: The Straw That Broke Virtualization’s Back
In this paper, we will discuss DataCore’s underlying parallel architecture, how it evolved over the years and how it results in a markedly different way to address the craving for IOPS (input/output operations per second) in a software-defined world.
Despite the increasing horsepower of modern multi-core processors and the promise of virtualization, we’re seeing relatively little progress in the amount of concurrent work they accomplish. That’s why we’re having to buy a lot more virtualized servers than we expected.

On closer examination, we find the root cause to be IO-starved virtual machines (VMs), especially for heavy online transactional processing (OLTP) apps, databases and mainstream IO-intensive workloads. Plenty of compute power is at their disposal, but servers have a tough time fielding inputs and outputs. This gives rise to an odd phenomenon of stalled virtualized apps while many processor cores remain idle.

So how exactly do we crank up IOs to keep up with the computational appetite while shaving costs? This can best be achieved by parallel IO technology designed to process IO across many cores simultaneously, thereby putting those idle CPUs to work. Such technology has been developed by DataCore Software, a long-time master of parallelism in the field of storage virtualization.

In this paper, we will discuss DataCore’s underlying parallel architecture, how it evolved over the years and how it results in a markedly different way to address the craving for IOPS (input/output operations per second) in a software-defined world.

DevOps or IT? The Right Team With The Right Culture
Keeping IT infrastructure environments running smoothly requires constant monitoring and maintenance skilled technicians with in-depth knowledge. In contrast, DevOps requirements include automation, integration, monitoring and collaboration within the IT infrastructure. Winning IT strategies will embrace both cultures in order to maximize effectiveness and responsiveness. Here we’ll explore what a company can do to create a DevOps culture capable of working hand-in-hand with traditional, skill

Traditional IT environments, so critical to most businesses, require a great deal of maintenance and monitoring in order to provide high levels of performance on a consistent basis. IT infrastructure includes computer hardware, operating systems, storage systems, and networking components in addition to the business software applications that support critical business functions. Keeping these elements running in harmony requires skilled technicians with in-depth knowledge of their specific segment of the total environment.

On  the  other  hand,  the  DevOps  experience  is  now  more  in  demand  than  ever.  The  single  areas  of  expertise and silos of knowledge are removed with software-defined environments that allow human resources to work together as a tightly bound team. This results in more effective use of resources with  a  dramatic  improvement  to  development  and  operational  agility.  DevOps  requirements  include  automation, integration, monitoring and collaboration within the IT infrastructure. Implementation of this  approach  nurtures  a  culture  that  removes  barriers  between  operations,  system  administrators,  engineers  and  developers,  delivering  the  best  results  possible,  and  improving  the  value  of  IT  to  end  users and customers.

There  is  no  right  or  wrong  approach.  Winning  IT  strategies  will  embrace  both  cultures  in  order  to  maximize effectiveness and responsiveness.  This paper will explore what a company needs, or should have in place, to create a DevOps culture capable of working hand-in-hand with traditional IT.

2017 Strategic Roadmap for Storage
Gartner offers recommendations for IT leaders responsible for infrastructure modernization and agility. Emerging storage hardware and software enable IT leaders to lower acquisition costs per terabyte and improve manageability. In addition to focusing on agility, automation and cost reductions, IT leaders should address the cultural changes and skill set shortages caused by digital business projects.
Key Findings:

•    Vendor consolidation continues in the storage and hyperconverged integrated system market, causing reassessments of vendor relationships, cost impacts and potential solution switches.
•    New storage initiatives focus on the need for agility, automation and cost reduction, as evidenced by the high adoption of solid-state arrays and HCIS, along with increasing interest in software-defined storage and drastically simplified integrated backup appliances.
•    Cloud storage continues to be a polarizing practice, with business more optimistic and IT more cautious, resulting in clashes and conflicts between tactical decisions and strategic movements.
•    Digital business and other new business initiatives often require changes in the culture between business units and IT operations; this highlights the challenges of skill set shortages in such areas as the evaluation and management of IT service providers.
StarWind Manager
StarWind Manager is a software solution developed to assist system administrators in performing their basic routine duties. StarWind Manager helps implementing, managing and monitoring Software-Defined Storage systems built with such solutions as StarWind Virtual SAN, Microsoft Storage Spaces Direct, and Ceph.

StarWind Manager is a software solution that provides the ability to control the storage infrastructure regardless of hardware or software utilized. Thus, you can build your storage system using such Software-Defined Storage solutions like StarWind Virtual SAN, Microsoft Storage Spaces Direct and Ceph. StarWind Manager easily integrates into any existing infrastructure providing customers with a single control panel to manage it.

The first version of StarWind Manager comes as a “Preview Release”, and thereby supports only the first three features, while the others will be available in the upcoming releases:

·         Web-based interface

StarWind Manager provides a unified web-interface that allows monitoring your Software-Defined Architecture built with StarWind Virtual SAN, S2D or Ceph.

·         Server Health Monitoring

The software allows monitoring your server health irrespective of the hardware used to build the infrastructure. The web-based interface will provide the information on the CPU, memory, disk and storage utilization, as well as IOPS and latency.

·         Support for SDS platforms

As of now, StarWind Manager allows you monitoring the S2D infrastructure. In the upcoming releases, the software will be monitoring and managing the architecture built using StarWind Virtual SAN and Ceph storage platforms.

·         REST architectural paradigm

Designed with REST API, StarWind Manager allows adjusting the interface, as well as reconfiguring and creating plugins.

·         Hypervisor support

In addition to storage management, the software will allow you managing Microsoft Hyper-V hosts.