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Showing 17 - 28 of 28 white papers, page 2 of 2.
How HC3 Lowers the Total Cost of Ownership
When considering a new IT infrastructure solution, the acquisition cost of the hardware and software to standup the infrastructure is only the starting point for cost analysis. It is important to look into the operational costs of deployment, training, licensing, scale out, downtime, and management. All of these considerations contribute to the total cost of ownership (TCO) of the solution.
When considering a new IT infrastructure solution, the acquisition cost of the hardware and software to standup the infrastructure is only the starting point for cost analysis. It is important to look into the operational costs of deployment, training, licensing, scale out, downtime, and management. All of these considerations contribute to the total cost of ownership (TCO) of the solution.

This document will dive into the TCO of the Scale Computing HC3 infrastructure solution and discuss how it compares to traditional architecture models. The combined considerations of different areas of costs will give a broader and more complete picture of how HC3 affects IT costs. With a focus on serving small and midmarket IT, Scale Computing is committed to making virtualization infrastructure both accessible and affordable for any size organization.
Achieve Secure Cloud Printing for Microsoft Office 365 and Azure
The Microsoft Azure platform offers an open and scalable Cloud computing platform as a service, providing a highly available Virtual Machine (VM) Cloud service payable on a monthly fee. For subscribers, critical services and server functions can now be moved with relative ease but what about printing, how realistic is that? This paper explores the topic further and considers what happens when subscribers elect to migrate everything, including print servers, offsite into the Cloud and pitfalls to
The Microsoft Azure platform offers an open and scalable Cloud computing platform as a service, providing a highly available Virtual Machine (VM) Cloud service payable on a monthly fee. For subscribers, critical services and server functions can now be moved with relative ease but what about printing, how realistic is that? Users are struggling with print file sizes and resultant bandwidth issues, not to mention security and compliance concerns. This paper explores the topic further and considers what happens when subscribers elect to migrate everything, including print servers, offsite into the Cloud and pitfalls to avoid.
Dummies Guide to Enterprise Cloud
The value proposition for Enterprise Cloud is simple—put all the agility of public cloud in your data center. That means you can spin up and tear down your next project in minutes, scale effortlessly and maintain total control of cost and performance.
The value proposition for Enterprise Cloud is simple—put all the agility of public cloud in your data center. That means you can spin up and tear down your next project in minutes, scale effortlessly and maintain total control of cost and performance.

But building an Enterprise Cloud may seem daunting—that’s why we created this Dummies Guide.

Key Takeaways:
1) The three defining characteristics of an enterprise cloud.
2) The four steps to enterprise cloud creation.
3) The ten business benefits of an enterprise cloud.

3 Potential Risks of an HCI Architecture
The appeal of HCI as a concept is that by bringing compute, network and storage together in a fully-tested, controlled environment, infrastructure administrators would be freed from the challenges of integrating point solutions and would have scalable, guaranteed performance at lower risk. For specific workloads such as VDI and ROBO, the theory is that customers can allocate resources quickly, scale easily, and reduce costs significantly because of the integration and features in its platform. T
The appeal of HCI as a concept is that by bringing compute, network and storage together in a fully-tested, controlled environment, infrastructure administrators would be freed from the challenges of integrating point solutions and would have scalable, guaranteed performance at lower risk. For specific workloads such as VDI and ROBO, the theory is that customers can allocate resources quickly, scale easily, and reduce costs significantly because of the integration and features in its platform. The reality is more complicated—it’s difficult for HCI to deliver scalability, simplicity, and cost advantages without sacrificing performance.
Application & Desktop Delivery for Dummies
In this book, you learn how solutions, such as Parallels Remote Application Server (RAS), replace traditional application deployment with on-demand application delivery, and why it's right for your organization.
Applications are essential to the businesses and organizations of all sizes and in all industries. End-users need to have continuous and reliable access to their applications whether working in the office or remotely, at any time of the day or night, and from any device. With the advent of cloud computing, office desktops with installed applications (that had to be constantly updated) have become a thing of the past — application streaming, virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI), and hosted applications are the future (and the present, for that matter). Application virtualization is an easy way to manage, distribute, and maintain business applications. Virtualized applications run on a server, while end-users view and interact with their applications over a network via a remote display protocol. Remote applications can be completely integrated with the user’s desktop so that they appear and behave like local applications. Today, you can dynamically publish applications to remote users in several ways. The server-based operating system (OS) instances that run remote applications can be shared with other users (a terminal services desktop), or the application can be running on its own OS instance on the server (a VDI desktop).
HyperCore-Direct: NVMe Optimized Hyperconvergence
Scale Computing’s award winning HC3 solution has long been a leader in the hyperconverged infrastructure space. Now targeting even higher performing workloads, Scale Computing is announcing HyperCore-Direct, the first hyperconverged solution to provide software defined block storage utilizing NVMe over fabrics at near bare-metal performance.
Scale Computing’s award winning HC3 solution has long been a leader in the hyperconverged infrastructure space. Now targeting even higher performing workloads, Scale Computing is announcing HyperCore-Direct, the first hyperconverged solution to provide software defined block storage utilizing NVMe over fabrics at near bare-metal performance. In this whitepaper, we will showcase the performance of a Scale HyperCore-Direct cluster which has been equipped with Intel P3700 NVMe drives, as well as a single-node HyperCore-Direct system with Intel Optane P4800X NVMe drives. Various workloads have been tested using off-the-shelf Linux and Windows virtual machine instances. The results show that HyperCore-Direct’s new NVMe optimized version of SCRIBE, the same software-defined- storage powering every HC3 cluster in production today, is able to offer the lowest latency per IO delivered to virtual machines.
HC3, SCRIBE and HyperCore Theory of Operations
This document is intended to describe the technology, concepts and operating theory behind the Scale Computing HC3 System (Hyper-converged Compute Cluster) and the HyperCore OS that powers it, including the SCRIBE (Scale Computing Reliable Independent Block Engine) storage layer.
This document is intended to describe the technology, concepts and operating theory behind the Scale Computing HC3 System (Hyper-converged Compute Cluster) and the HyperCore OS that powers it, including the SCRIBE (Scale Computing Reliable Independent Block Engine) storage layer.
Information Security with HC3
The security of your information and data is paramount to Scale Computing. In order to be agile in the ever-changing security landscape, all technology platforms must adapt quickly. Threat vectors from new avenues are emerging on a daily basis.
The security of your information and data is paramount to Scale Computing. In order to be agile in the ever-changing security landscape, all technology platforms must adapt quickly. Threat vectors from new avenues are emerging on a daily basis.

Our culture has always been about having an exceptionally efficient and focused engineering team. A tight-knit, highly skilled team of engineers and developers cuts back on the red tape and delay that may be present in other organizations and keeps the focus on what matters in this ever-changing and always demanding landscape: innovation, stability, and security for the customer. In keeping with this culture, we have built the HC3 appliance using our own proprietary software in combination with common building blocks of well-tested open source technologies.
Print File Formats: A Comparative Analysis of EMR, OpenXPS and PDF for Enterprise Printing
Universal Printer Driver technology can simplify printer management, increase security and reduce print output. UPDs make it possible to convert documents of any type, while a virtual printer can be installed on a server and made available for printing on the local network. Yet there is continued debate concerning the most appropriate UPD file formats. The purpose of this white paper is to provide a technical comparison and analysis of each of the three most widely adopted print file formats w
Universal Printer Driver technology can simplify printer management, increase security and reduce print output. UPDs make it possible to convert documents of any type, while a virtual printer can be installed on a server and made available for printing on the local network. Yet there is continued debate concerning the most appropriate UPD file formats.

The purpose of this white paper is to provide a technical comparison and analysis of each of the three most widely adopted print file formats within Universal Printer Driver (UPD) solutions, and how they influence printing performance in enterprise computing environments.
Salem State University Teams with IGEL, Citrix and Nutanix to Deliver Digital Workspaces
Limited IT resources drive need for the IGEL’s robust management features; maturity of Citrix virtual desktop infrastructure, and the simplicity and time-to-value for Nutanix’s hyperconverged infrastructure offering make the combined solution a no-brainer for the university.
When Jake Snyder joined Salem State University’s IT department, the public university located just outside of Boston, Mass. was only using traditional PCs. “95% of the PCs were still on Windows 7 and there was no clear migration path in sight to Windows 10,” recalls Snyder. “Additionally, all updates to these aging desktop computers were being done locally in the university’s computer labs. Management was difficult and time consuming.”

The university realized something had to change, and that was one of the reasons why they brought Snyder on board – to upgrade its end-user computing environment to VDI. Salem State was looking for the security and manageability that a VDI solution could provide. “One of the biggest challenges that the university had been experiencing was managing desktop imaging and applications,” said Snyder. “They wanted to be able to keep their student, faculty and staff end-points up to date and secure, while at the same time easing the troubleshooting process. They weren’t able to do any of this with their current set-up.”

Snyder first saw a demo of the IGEL solution at the final BriForum event in Boston in 2016. “It was great to see IGEL at that event as I had heard a lot of good buzz around their products and solutions, especially from other colleagues in the industry,” said Snyder. “After BriForum, I went back and ordered some evaluation units to test out within our EUC environment.”

What Snyder quickly discovered during the evaluation period was that the IGEL Universal Management Suite (UMS) was not just plug-and-play, like he had expected. “The IGEL UMS was a very customizable solution, and I liked the robust interface,” continued Snyder. “Despite competitive solutions, it was clear from the start that the IGEL devices were going to be easier to use and cheaper in the long run. IGEL really was a ‘no-brainer’ when you consider the management capabilities and five-year warranty they offer on their hardware.”

Salem State University currently has 400 IGEL Universal Desktop software-defined thin clients deployed on its campus including 360 UD3 thin clients, which are the workhorse of the IGEL portfolio, and 40 UD6 thin clients, which support high-end graphics capabilities for multimedia users. Salem State has also purchased IGEL UD Pocket micro thin clients which they are now testing.
Strayer University Improves End User Computing Experience with IGEL
Strayer University is leveraging the IGEL Universal Desktop Converter (UDC) and IGEL UD3 to provide faculty, administrators and student support staff with seamless and reliable access to their digital workspaces.
As IT operations manager for Strayer University, Scott Behrens spent a lot of time looking at and evaluating endpoint computing solutions when it came to identifying a new way to provide the University’s faculty, administrators and student support staff with a seamless and reliable end user computing experience.

“I looked at various options including traditional desktops, but due to the dispersed nature of our business, I really wanted to find a solution that was both easy to manage and reasonably priced,

especially for our remote locations where we have limited or no IT staff on premise,” said Behrens. “IGEL fit perfectly into this scenario. Because of IGEL’s simplicity, we are able to reduce the time it takes to get one of our locations up and running from a week, to a day, with little support and very little effort.”

Strayer University first began its IGEL deployment in 2016, with a small pilot program of 30 users in the IGEL UDC. The university soon expanded its deployment, adding the IGEL UD3 and then Samsung All-in-One thin clients outfitted with the IGEL OS and IGEL Universal Management Suite (UMS). Strayer University’s IGEL deployment now includes more than 2,000 endpoints at 75 locations across the United States. The university plans to extend its deployment of the IGEL UD3s further as it grows and the need arises to replace aging desktop hardware.
IGEL Delivers Manageability, Scalability and Security for The Auto Club Group
The Auto Club Group realizes cost-savings; increased productivity; and improved time-to-value with IGEL’s software-defined endpoint management solutions.
In 2016, The Auto Club Group was starting to implement a virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) solution leveraging Citrix XenDesktop on both its static endpoints and laptop computers used in the field by its insurance agents, adjusters and other remote employees. “We were having a difficult time identifying a solution that would enable us to simplify the management of our laptop computers, in particular, while providing us with the flexibility, scalability and security we wanted from an endpoint management perspective,” said James McVicar, IT Architect, The Auto Club Group.

Some of the mobility management solutions The Auto Club has been evaluating relied on Windows CE, a solution that is nearing end-of-life. “We didn’t want to deal with the patches and other management headaches related to a Windows-based solutions, so this was not an attractive option,” said McVicar.

In the search for a mobile endpoint management solution, McVicar and his team came across IGEL and were quickly impressed. McVicar said, “What first drew our attention to IGEL was the ability to leverage the IGEL UDC to quickly and easily convert our existing laptop computers into an IGEL OS-powered desktop computing solution, that we could then manage via the IGEL UMS. Because IGEL is Linux-based, we found that it offered both the functionality and stability we needed within our enterprise.”

As The Auto Club Group continues to expand its operations, it will be rolling out additional IGEL OS-powered endpoints to its remote workers, and expects its deployment to exceed 400 endpoints once the project is complete.

The Auto Club Group is also looking at possibly leveraging the IGEL Cloud Gateway, which will help bring more performance and functionality to those working outside of the corporate WAN.