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How to Avoid These 5 Packet Broker Deployment Errors

By Alastair Hartrup, CEO of Network Critical

As networks advance and evolve, monitoring tools have taken on an increasingly important role in delivering vital information for today's modern digital businesses. In my previous article, I explained how common configuration mistakes can hinder TAP performance. For this article, I'd like to focus on the important role of the Packet Broker in an organization's visibility architecture. As with TAPs, special care must also be taken when deploying Packet Brokers. I'll explore some of the common mistakes engineers should avoid when utilizing the more sophisticated Packet Broker features. By becoming aware of these potential problem areas, network managers can implement an efficient visibility architecture and avoid errors that could adversely affect network monitoring, performance and ultimately business operations.

Here are 5 common Packet Broker deployment errors, and how to avoid them:

1.    Is it a TAP or a Packet Broker?

TAPs are relatively simple devices that are often confused with Packet Brokers. Both TAPs and Packer Brokers provide tool connectivity and have similar feature sets. However, TAPs provide failsafe network ports. These ports have copper relays or optical splitters that will keep network traffic flowing even if power is lost to the TAP. Packet Brokers generally do not have failsafe network ports. Therefore, it's important to make the initial network connections using TAPs and send the traffic through to the Packet Broker for management. There are some combination TAP/Packet Brokers on the market that provide failsafe network connections and Packet Broker features. These combo (or Hybrid) units can save space and money depending on network size, complexity, and ports needed.

2.    New High-Speed Links May Require Buying New Monitoring Tools

With ever-increasing bandwidth demands on networks, new links are often moving from copper connections (10Mbps to 100Mbps) to optical fiber (1Gbps), or from lower-speed fiber (1Gbps) to high-speed fiber (10Gbps - 100Gbps). Changing link media does not necessarily require replacing all legacy monitoring tools. Packet Brokers provide load balancing features that allow high-speed network links to evenly distribute the traffic among a number of lower-speed tools. For example, an incoming network connection at 40Gbps can be connected to a Packet Broker and distributed through output/tool ports to five monitoring devices with a maximum processing capacity of 8Gbps each. This feature allows network managers to save CAPEX on monitoring tools while keeping pace with faster networking speeds.

3.    You Can Use a Packet Broker for In-Line Security Tools

Many security tools require in-line access to links, meaning that live traffic passes through the tool and back into the network. There are many TAPs that provide in-line access so the tool can have real-time control over live traffic. These TAPs protect live links through an active bypass function that keeps network traffic flowing even if the security tool is taken offline. In complex networks, managers may be tempted to use multiple independent TAPs for in-line security tools, and Packet Brokers only to manage passive monitoring tools. Packet Brokers however, can pass real-time traffic delivered through in-line TAPs. This allows the Packet Broker to manage both in-line security and passive monitoring tools through one central device, simplifying deployment of all connected tools.

4.    Don't Confuse Packet Slicing with Packet Manipulation

Packet Slicing is a Packet Broker feature that removes the payload from a packet before it arrives at the monitoring tool. This is done when only packet header information is required by the monitoring tool. Packet slicing can be an efficiency feature that allows the monitoring tool to work faster. It's also an important feature for privacy and legal compliance when monitoring equipment shouldn't have access to actual payload data. Accurate traffic monitoring, however, often requires visibility to the entire packet size in order to accurately capture and report on packet size and time through the network. There are Packet Brokers that provide packet manipulation, which is similar to slicing, but more complex and more accurate for traffic monitoring and planning. This is done by replacing payload information with random 1's and 0's rather than simply removing the payload. Packet manipulation provides privacy compliance, accurate traffic management and a wider range of user-defined options for traffic analysis.

5.    Plan for the Future, Plan for Scale

When designing a visibility architecture, it's critical that future needs be included in the plan. Plan A is purchasing more equipment and ports than initially required to be sure that future capacity for new links and tools is built into the initial plan. Plan B is to purchase only what is needed for today and worry about future needs and budget when the time comes. However the best plan, Plan C, is to carefully evaluate all Packet Broker equipment options to build extensibility into the plan without breaking the budget. Some Packet Brokers offer scale-out options that allow the purchase of smaller initial units for immediate needs and provide extension units for future growth. This plan allows immediate budgetary savings and provides for growth by simple add-on rather than replacement of older equipment.

With today's increasingly complex networks, achieving continuous visibility and control is only possible through specialized monitoring and security tools that are connected to live links. But if these tools are improperly installed, the benefits of using them can be negated. Trends around BYOD, IoT, social media, and more, are increasing network traffic and malicious activity, making it harder to ensure performance and secure users. Becoming aware of the various ways that a Packet Brokers (and TAPs) can unintentionally be hindering your network visibility will save time and money, and better meet the needs of your businesses' IT.

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About the Author

Alastair Hartrup 

Alastair Hartrup is the CEO and founder of Network Critical, a company that provides industry-leading network TAPs and Packet Brokers, which help organizations increase visibility across dynamic and complex networks. He founded Network Critical in 1997, and today more than 5,000 companies worldwide rely on its technology to help power the network and security monitoring tools needed to control changing infrastructure.

Published Wednesday, September 04, 2019 7:37 AM by David Marshall
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