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Cybersixgill 2024 Predictions: AI Evolves, Consolidation and Regulatory Mandates Continue

vmblog-predictions-2024 

Industry executives and experts share their predictions for 2024.  Read them in this 16th annual VMblog.com series exclusive.

2024 Predictions for Cyber Threat Intel: AI Evolves, Consolidation and Regulatory Mandates Continue

By Sharon Wagner, CEO, Cybersixgill

Over the past year, we've witnessed significant developments in cybersecurity, including the emergence of generative AI and its ability to enhance organizations' threat intelligence efforts, and the rise of Threat Exposure Management, a program of consolidation to identify and mitigate risk and strengthen cyber defense proactively. 

With these advancements, curated threat intelligence is gaining prominence and accessibility, delivering relevant, contextual data based on a company's attack surface and the effectiveness of its security stack. The following are predictions as to what we may see taking shape in 2024:

AI will evolve to become more broadly accessible while cybersecurity vendors continue to address the reliability, diversity, and privacy of data.

  • AI's value is rooted in the breadth and reliability of data, which Cybersixgill predicts will significantly improve in 2024 as AI vendors advance the richness and fidelity of results.
  • AI will become broadly accessible to practitioners, regardless of their skillset or maturity level.
  • As concerns for data privacy with AI grow, companies will form their own policies while waiting for government entities to enact regulatory legislation. The U.S. and other countries may establish some regulations in 2024, although clear policies may not take shape until 2025 or later.

AI will be used as an attack tool - and a target. Black hat hackers will increasingly use AI to improve effectiveness, and legitimate use of AI will surface as a prominent attack vector.

  • Threat actors will use AI to increase the frequency and accuracy of their activities by automating large-scale cyberattacks, creating duplicitous phishing email campaigns, and developing malicious content targeting companies, employees, and customers.
  • Malicious attacks like data poisoning and vulnerability exploitation in AI models will also gain momentum, which cause organizations to provide sensitive information to untrustworthy parties unwittingly. Similarly, AI models can be trained to identify and exploit vulnerabilities in computer networks without detection.
  • The rise of shadow generative AI, where employees use AI tools without organizational approval or oversight. Shadow generative AI can lead to data leaks, compromised accounts, and widening vulnerability gaps in a company's attack surface.

Tighter regulations and cybersecurity mandates hold the C-suite and Boards accountable for corporations' cyber hygiene. Companies must prove vulnerability prioritization and risk management with evidence-based data.

  • As attack surfaces widen and the frequency and scale of attacks grow, regulatory mandates will hold business leaders more accountable for their organization's cyber hygiene. The C-suite and other executives will need a clearer understanding of their organization's cybersecurity policies, processes, and tools. Cybersixgill believes companies will increasingly appoint cybersecurity experts on the Board to fulfill progressively stringent reporting requirements and conduct good cyber governance.
  • Changes to the Payment Card Industry's Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) v. 4.0 will pressure retail, healthcare, and finance companies to follow the new reporting requirement by March 2024. These requirements will drive a more vital need for proactive threat intelligence to help mitigate risk, continuously identify gaps, and strengthen cyber hygiene.

Geopolitical and other issues will broaden attackers' motivations beyond financial gain, resulting in a growing pool of targets, attack vectors, and tactics.

  • In 2024, 40 national elections will occur worldwide. As threat actors' motivations stretch beyond financial gain, Cybersixgill predicts an uptick in attacks targeting entities without profit centers, such as schools, hospitals, public utilities, and other essential services, as bad actors aim to gain power and influence and cause general disorder.
  • Cybercriminals will increasingly offer their skills and expertise for hire through ransomware-as-a-service, malware-as-a-service, and DDoS-as-a-service offerings.
  • Affiliate programs will continue to grow as powerful cybercriminal gangs franchise their ransomware technology, scaling operations to a network of lesser-skilled individuals for distribution, making the extortion business accessible and profitable to a larger pool of threat actors

As security teams hone their strategies against malicious actors, these trends will play an even bigger role in the coming year and beyond.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Sharon Wagner 

Sharon is the CEO of Cybersixgill, a global leader in cyber threat intel (CTI). Prior to Cybersixgill, Sharon was co-founder and CEO of Cloudyn, a cloud performance and cost optimization company acquired by Microsoft in July 2017. Sharon has also held leadership positions at CA Technologies and Oblicore, which was also acquired by CA Technologies. Sharon is a respected thought leader in the industry and is passionate about helping businesses leverage technology to improve their operations and bottom line.  He has a Master's degree in philosophy and science from Bar-Ilan University and a B.A. in computer science and math from Netanya Academic College.

Published Monday, December 04, 2023 7:34 AM by David Marshall
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