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Showing 17 - 32 of 36 white papers, page 2 of 3.
Lift and Shift Backup and Disaster Recovery Scenario for Google Cloud: Step by Step Guide
There are many new challenges, and reasons, to migrate workloads to the cloud. Especially for public cloud, like Google Cloud Platform. Whether it is for backup, disaster recovery, or production in the cloud, you should be able to leverage the cloud platform to solve your technology challenges. In this step-by-step guide, we outline how GCP is positioned to be one of the easiest cloud platforms for app development. And, the critical role data protection as-as-service (DPaaS) can play.

There are many new challenges, and reasons, to migrate workloads to the cloud.

For example, here are four of the most popular:

  • Analytics and Machine learning (ML) are everywhere. Once you have your data in a cloud platform like Google Cloud Platform, you can leverage their APIs to run analytics and ML on everything.
  • Kubernetes is powerful and scalable, but transitioning legacy apps to Kubernetes can be daunting.
  • SAP HANA is a secret weapon. With high mem instances in the double digit TeraBytes migrating SAP to a cloud platform is easier than ever.
  • Serverless is the future for application development. With CloudSQL, Big Query, and all the other serverless solutions, cloud platforms like GCP are well positioned to be the easiest platform for app development.

Whether it is for backup, disaster recovery, or production in the cloud, you should be able to leverage the cloud platform to solve your technology challenges. In this step-by-step guide, we outline how GCP is positioned to be one of the easiest cloud platforms for app development. And, the critical role data protection as-as-service (DPaaS) can play.

The SysAdmin Guide to Azure Infrastructure as a Service
If you're used to on-premises infrastructures, cloud platforms can seem daunting. But it doesn't need to be. This eBook written by the veteran IT consultant and trainer Paul Schnackenburg, covers all aspects of setting up and maintaining a high-performing Azure IaaS environment, including: • VM sizing and deployment • Migration • Storage and networking • Security and identity • Infrastructure as code and more!

The cloud computing era is well and truly upon us, and knowing how to take advantage of the benefits of this computing paradigm while maintaining security, manageability, and cost control are vital skills for any IT professional in 2020 and beyond. And its importance is only getting greater.

In this eBook, we’re going to focus on Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) on Microsoft’s Azure platform - learning how to create VMs, size them correctly, manage storage, networking, and security, along with backup best practices. You’ll also learn how to operate groups of VMs, deploy resources based on templates, managing security and automate your infrastructure. If you currently have VMs in your own datacenter and are looking to migrate to Azure, we’ll also teach you that.

If you’re new to the cloud (or have experience with AWS/GCP but not Azure), this book will cover the basics as well as more advanced skills. Given how fast things change in the cloud, we’ll cover the why (as well as the how) so that as features and interfaces are updated, you’ll have the theoretical knowledge to effectively adapt and know how to proceed.

You’ll benefit most from this book if you actively follow along with the tutorials. We will be going through terms and definitions as we go – learning by doing has always been my preferred way of education. If you don’t have access to an Azure subscription, you can sign up for a free trial with Microsoft. This will give you 30 days 6 to use $200 USD worth of Azure resources, along with 12 months of free resources. Note that most of these “12 months” services aren’t related to IaaS VMs (apart from a few SSD based virtual disks and a small VM that you can run for 750 hours a month) so be sure to get everything covered on the IaaS side before your trial expires. There are also another 25 services that have free tiers “forever”.

Now you know what’s in store, let’s get started!

Evaluator Group Report on Liqid Composable Infrastructure
In this report from Eric Slack, Senior Analyst at the Evaluator Group, learn how Liqid’s software-defined platform delivers comprehensive, multi-fabric composable infrastructure for the industry’s widest array of data center resources.
Composable Infrastructures direct-connect compute and storage resources dynamically—using virtualized networking techniques controlled by software. Instead of physically constructing a server with specific internal devices (storage, NICs, GPUs or FPGAs), or cabling the appropriate device chassis to a server, composable enables the virtual connection of these resources at the device level as needed, when needed.

Download this report from Eric Slack, Senior Analyst at the Evaluator Group to learn how Liqid’s software-defined platform delivers comprehensive, multi-fabric composable infrastructure for the industry’s widest array of data center resources.
Exploring AIOps: Cluster Analysis for Events
AIOps, i.e., artificial intelligence for IT operations, has become the latest strategy du jour in the IT operations management space to help address and better manage the growing complexity and extreme scale of modern IT environments. AIOps enables some unique and new capabilities on this front, though it is quite a bit more complicated than the panacea that it is made out to be. However, the underlying AI and machine learning (ML) concepts do help complement, supplement and, in particular cases
AIOps, i.e., artificial intelligence for IT operations, has become the latest strategy du jour in the IT operations management space to help address and better manage the growing complexity and extreme scale of modern IT environments. AIOps enables some unique and new capabilities on this front, though it is quite a bit more complicated than the panacea that it is made out to be. However, the underlying AI and machine learning (ML) concepts do help complement, supplement and, in particular cases, even supplant more traditional approaches to handling typical IT Ops scenarios at scale.

An AIOps platform has to ingest and deal with multiple types of data to develop a comprehensive understanding of the state of the managed domain(s) and to better discern the push and pull of diverse trends in the environment, both overt and subtle, that may destabilize critical business outcomes. In this white paper, we will take a look at an AIOps approach to handling one of the fundamental data types: events.
Jumpstart your Disaster Recovery and Remote Work Strategy: 6 Considerations for your Virtual Desktop
If you have a business continuity strategy or not, this guide will help to understand the unique considerations (and advantages) to remote desktops. Learn how your virtualized environments are suited to good DR and how they can be optimized to protect your organization from that worst-case scenario.
If you have a business continuity strategy or not, this guide will help to understand the unique considerations (and advantages) to remote desktops. Learn how your virtualized environments are suited to good DR and how they can be optimized to protect your organization from that worst-case scenario.
Key Considerations for Configuring Virtual Desktops For Remote Work
At any time, organizations worldwide and individuals can be forced to work from home. Learn about a sustainable solution to enable your remote workforce quickly and easily and gain tips to enhance your business continuity strategy when it comes to employee computing resources.

Assess what you already have

If you have a business continuity plan or a disaster recovery plan in place, that’s a good place to start. This scenario may not fit the definition of disaster that you originally intended, but it can serve to help you test your plan in a more controlled fashion that can benefit both your current situation by giving you a head start, and your overall plan by revealing gaps that would be more problematic in a more urgent or catastrophic environment with less time to prepare and implement.

Does your plan include access to remote desktops in a data center or the cloud? If so, and you already have a service in place ready to transition or expand, you’re well on your way.

Read the guide to learn what it takes for IT teams to set up staff to work effectively from home with virtual desktop deployments. Learn how to get started, if you’re new to VDI or if you already have an existing remote desktop scenario but are looking for alternatives.

The State of Multicloud: Virtual Desktop Deployments
Download this free 15-page report to understand the key differences and benefits to the many cloud deployment models and the factors that are driving tomorrow’s decisions.

The future of compute is in the cloud

Flexible, efficient, and economical, the cloud is no longer a question - it's the answer.

IT professionals that once considered if or when to migrate to the cloud are now talking about how. Earlier this year, we reached out to thousands of IT professionals to learn more about how.

Private Cloud, On-Prem, Public Cloud, Hybrid, Multicloud - each of these deployment models offers unique advantages and challenges. We asked IT decision-makers how they are currently leveraging the cloud and how they plan to grow.

Survey respondents overwhelmingly believed in the importance of a hybrid or multicloud strategy, regardless of whether they had actually implemented one themselves.

The top reasons for moving workloads between clouds

  • Cost Savings
  • Disaster Recovery
  • Data Center Location
  • Availability of Virtual Machines/GPUs
IDC: SaaS Backup and Recovery: Simplified Data Protection Without Compromise
Although the majority of organizations have a "cloud first" strategy, most also continue to manage onsite applications and the backup infrastructure associated with them. However, many are moving away from backup specialists and instead are leaving the task to virtual infrastructure administrators or other IT generalists. Metallic represents Commvault's direct entry into one of the fastest-growing segments of the data protection market. Its hallmarks are simplicity and flexibility of deployment

Metallic is a new SaaS backup and recovery solution based on Commvault's data protection software suite, proven in the marketplace for more than 20 years. It is designed specifically for the needs of medium-scale enterprises but is architected to grow with them based on data growth, user growth, or other requirements. Metallic initially offers either monthly or annual subscriptions through reseller partners; it will be available through cloud service providers and managed service providers over time. The initial workload use cases for Metallic include virtual machine (VM), SQL Server, file server, MS Office 365, and endpoint device recovery support; the company expects to add more use cases and supported workloads as the solution evolves.

Metallic is designed to offer flexibility as one of the service's hallmarks. Aspects of this include:

  • On-demand infrastructure: Metallic manages the cloud-based infrastructure components and software for the backup environment, though the customer will still manage any of its own on- premise infrastructure. This environment will support on-premise, cloud, and hybrid workloads. IT organizations are relieved of the daily task of managing the infrastructure components and do not have to worry about upgrades, OS or firmware updates and the like, for the cloud infrastructure, so people can repurpose that time saved toward other activities.
  • Metallic offers preconfigured plans designed to have users up and running in approximately 15 minutes, eliminating the need for a proof-of-concept test. These preconfigured systems have Commvault best practices built into the design, or organizations can configure their own.
  • Partner-delivered services: Metallic plans to go to market with resellers that can offer a range of services on top of the basic solution's capabilities. These services will vary by provider and will give users a variety of choices when selecting a provider to match the services offered with the organization's needs.
  • "Bring your own storage": Among the flexible options of Metallic, including VM and file or SQL database use cases, users can deploy their own storage, either on-premise or in the cloud, while utilizing the backup/recovery services of Metallic. The company refers to this option as "SaaS Plus."
Confronting modern stealth
How did we go from train robberies to complex, multi-billion-dollar cybercrimes? The escalation in the sophistication of cybercriminal techniques, which overcome traditional cybersecurity and wreak havoc without leaving a trace, is dizzying. Explore the methods of defense created to defend against evasive attacks, then find out how Kaspersky’s sandboxing, endpoint detection and response, and endpoint protection technologies can keep you secure—even if you lack the resources or talent.
Explore the dizzying escalation in the sophistication of cybercriminal techniques, which overcome traditional cybersecurity and wreak havoc without leaving a trace. Then discover the methods of defense created to stop these evasive attacks.

Problem:
Fileless threats challenge businesses with traditional endpoint solutions because they lack a specific file to target. They might be stored in WMI subscriptions or the registry, or execute directly in the memory without being saved on disk. These types of attack are ten times more likely to succeed than file-based attacks.

Solution:
Kaspersky Endpoint Security for Business goes beyond file analysis to analyze behavior in your environment. While its behavioral detection technology runs continuous proactive machine learning processes, its exploit prevention technology blocks attempts by malware to exploit software vulnerabilities.

Problem:
The talent shortage is real. While cybercriminals are continuously adding to their skillset, businesses either can’t afford (or have trouble recruiting and retaining) cybersecurity experts.

Solution:
Kaspersky Sandbox acts as a bridge between overwhelmed IT teams and industry-leading security analysis. It relieves IT pressure by automatically blocking complex threats at the workstation level so they can be analyzed and dealt with properly in time.


Problem:
Advanced Persistent Threats (APTs) expand laterally from device to device and can put an organization in a constant state of attack.

Solution:
Endpoint Detection and Response (EDR) stops APTs in their tracks with a range of very specific capabilities, which can be grouped into two categories: visibility (visualizing all endpoints, context and intel) and analysis (analyzing multiple verdicts as a single incident).
    
Attack the latest threats with a holistic approach including tightly integrated solutions like Kaspersky Endpoint Detection and Response and Kaspersky Sandbox, which integrate seamlessly with Kaspersky Endpoint Protection for Business.
Work From Home Workspace Strategies
This whitepaper has been authored by experts at Liquidware in order to provide information and guidance concerning the deployment of Work From Home (WFH) strategies to provide business continuity during times of crisis or unplanned outages. Liquidware Adaptive Workspace Management solutions can speed the launch of virtual workspaces that support WFH options, ensuring that sound data drives decision-making and all migration processes are automated and streamlined.
This whitepaper has been authored by experts at Liquidware in order to provide information and guidance concerning the deployment of Work From Home (WFH) strategies to provide business continuity during times of crisis or unplanned outages. Liquidware Adaptive Workspace Management solutions can speed the launch of virtual workspaces that support WFH options, ensuring that sound data drives decision-making and all migration processes are automated and streamlined. Information in this document is subject to change without notice. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and recording for any external use by any person or entity without the express prior written consent of Liquidware.
Process Optimization with Stratusphere UX
This whitepaper explores the developments of the past decade that have prompted the need for Stratusphere UX Process Optimization. We also cover how this feature works and the advantages it provides, including specific capital and operating cost benefits.

Managing the performance of Windows-based workloads can be a challenge. Whether physical PCs or virtual desktops, the effort required to maintain, tune and optimize workspaces is endless. Operating system and application revisions, user installed applications, security and bug patches, BIOS and driver updates, spyware, multi-user operating systems supply a continual flow of change that can disrupt expected performance. When you add in the complexities introduced by virtual desktops and cloud architectures, you have added another infinite source of performance instability. Keeping up with this churn, as well as meeting users’ zero tolerance for failures, are chief worries for administrators.

To help address the need for uniform performance and optimization in light of constant change, Liquidware introduced the Process Optimization feature in its Stratusphere UX solution. This feature can be set to automatically optimize CPU and Memory, even as system demands fluctuate. Process Optimization can keep “bad actor” applications or runaway processes from crippling the performance of users’ workspaces by prioritizing resources for those being actively used over not used or background processes. The Process Optimization feature requires no additional infrastructure. It is a simple, zero-impact feature that is included with Stratusphere UX. It can be turned on for single machines, or groups, or globally. Launched with the check of a box, you can select from pre-built profiles that operate automatically. Or administrators can manually specify the processes they need to raise, lower or terminate, if that task becomes required. This feature is a major benefit in hybrid multi-platform environments that include physical, pool or image-based virtual and cloud workspaces, which are much more complex than single-delivery systems. The Process Optimization feature was designed with security and reliability in mind. By default, this feature employs a “do no harm” provision affecting normal and lower process priorities, and a relaxed policy. No processes are forced by default when access is denied by the system, ensuring that the system remains stable and in line with requirements.

Introduction to Microsoft Windows Virtual Desktop
This whitepaper provides an overview of WVD and a historical perspective of the evolution of Windows desktops – especially multi-session Windows. This paper was authored by industry veterans with active involvement in multi-session Windows desktop computing since its inception in the early 1990s. Disclaimer: Professionals at Liquidware, a Microsoft WVD partner, authored this paper based on information available at the time of writing.
Microsoft announced the general availability of Windows Virtual Desktop (WVD) on September 30, 2019. The release came after an initial public-preview-evaluation program that lasted about six months. This whitepaper provides an overview of WVD and a historical perspective of the evolution of Windows desktops – especially multi-session Windows. This paper was authored by industry veterans with active involvement in multi-session Windows desktop computing since its inception in the early 1990s. Disclaimer: Professionals at Liquidware, a Microsoft WVD partner, authored this paper based on information available at the time of writing. Information regarding WVD is evolving quickly; consequently, readers should understand that this whitepaper (v2.0) presents the most up-to-date information available. Any inaccuracies in this paper are unintentional. Research and buying decisions are ultimately the readers’ responsibility.
Unlocking Digital Transformation with Adaptive Workspace Management
Digital transformation can be stalled for organizations that do not start this process of re-architecting their workspace provisioning approaches. In this whitepaper, Liquidware presents a roadmap for delivering modern workspaces for organizations which are undergoing digital transformation. Liquidware’s Adaptive Workspace Management (AWM) suite of products can support the build-out of an agile, state-of-the-art workspace infrastructure that quickly delivers the resources workers need, on demand

The driving force for organizations today is digital transformation, propelled by a need for greater innovation and agility across enterprises. The digital life-blood for this transformation remains computers, although their form-factor has changed dramatically over the past decade.  Smart devices, including phones, tablets and wearables, have joined PCs and laptops in the daily toolsets used by workers to do their jobs.  The data that organizations rely on increasingly comes from direct sources via smart cards, monitors, implants and embedded processors. IoT, machine learning and artificial intelligence will shape the software that workers use to do their jobs. As these “smart” applications change and take on scope, they will increasingly be deployed on cloud infrastructures, bringing computing to the edge and enabling swift and efficient processing with real-time data.

Yet digital transformation for many organizations can remain blocked if they do not start changing how their workspaces are provisioned. Many still rely on outmoded approaches for delivering the technology needed by their workers to make them productive in a highly digital workplace.

In this paper, Liquidware presents a roadmap for providing modern workspaces for organizations that are undergoing digital transformation. We offer insights into how our Adaptive Workspace Management (AWM) suite of products can support the build-out of an agile,  state-of-the-artworkspace infrastructure that quickly delivers the resources workers need, on demand. AWM allows this  infrastructure  to be constructed from a hybrid mix of the best-of-breed workspace delivery platforms spanning physical, virtual and cloud offerings.

Digital Workspace Disasters and How to Beat Them
This paper looks at risk management as it relates to the Windows desktops that are permanently connected to a campus, head office or branch network. In particular, we will look at how ‘digital workspace’ solutions designed to streamline desktop delivery and provide greater user flexibility can also be leveraged to enable a more effective and efficient approach to desktop disaster recovery (DR).
Desktop DR - the recovery of individual desktop systems from a disaster or system failure - has long been a challenge. Part of the problem is that there are so many desktops, storing so much valuable data and - unlike servers - with so many different end user configurations and too little central control. Imaging everyone would be a huge task, generating huge amounts of backup data. And even if those problems could be overcome with the use of software agents, plus de-deduplication to take common files such as the operating system out of the backup window, restoring damaged systems could still mean days of software reinstallation and reconfiguration. Yet at the same time, most organizations have a strategic need to deploy and provision new desktop systems, and to be able to migrate existing ones to new platforms. Again, these are tasks that benefit from reducing both duplication and the need to reconfigure the resulting installation. The parallels with desktop DR should be clear. We often write about the importance of an integrated approach to investing in backup and recovery. By bringing together business needs that have a shared technical foundation, we can, for example, gain incremental benefits from backup, such as improved data visibility and governance, or we can gain DR capabilities from an investment in systems and data management. So it is with desktop DR and user workspace management. Both of these are growing in importance as organizations’ desktop estates grow more complex. Not only are we adding more ways to work online, such as virtual PCs, more applications, and more layers of middleware, but the resulting systems face more risks and threats and are subject to higher regulatory and legal requirements. Increasingly then, both desktop DR and UWM will be not just valuable, but essential. Getting one as an incremental bonus from the other therefore not only strengthens the business case for that investment proposal, it is a win-win scenario in its own right.
Optimising Performance for Office 365 and Large Profiles with ProfileUnity ProfileDisk
This whitepaper has been authored by experts at Liquidware Labs in order to provide guidance to adopters of desktop virtualization technologies. In this paper, two types of profile management with ProfileUnity are outlined: (1) ProfileDisk and (2) Profile Portability. This paper covers best practice recommendations for each technology and when they can be used together. ProfileUnity is the only full featured UEM solution on the market to feature an embedded ProfileDisk technology and the advanta

Managing Windows user profiles can be a complex and challenging process. Better profile management is usually sought by organizations looking to reduce Windows login times, accommodate applications that do not adhere to best practice application data storage, and to give users the flexibility to login to any Windows Operating System (OS) and have their profile follow them.

Note that additional profile challenges and solutions are covered in a related ProfileUnity whitepaper entitled “User Profile and Environment Management with ProfileUnity.” To efficiently manage the complex challenges of today’s diverse Windows profile environments, Liquidware ProfileUnity exclusively features two user profile technologies that can be used together or separately depending on the use case. These include:

1. ProfileDisk™, a virtual disk based profile that delivers the entire profile as a layer from an attached user VHD or VMDK, and

2. Profile Portability, a file and registry based profile solution that restores files at login, post login, or based on environment triggers.

Application Lifecycle Management with Stratusphere UX
This whitepaper defines three major lifecycle stages—analysis, user experience baselining and operationalization―each of which is composed of several crucial steps. The paper also provides practical use examples that will help you create and execute an application-lifecycle methodology using Stratusphere UX from Liquidware.
Enterprises today are faced with many challenges, and among those at the top of the list is the struggle surrounding the design, deployment, management and operations that support desktop applications. The demand for applications is increasing at an exponential rate, and organizations are being forced to consider platforms beyond physical, virtual and cloud-based environments. Users have come to expect applications to ‘just work’ on whatever device they have on hand. Combined with the notion that for many organizations, workspaces can be a mix of various delivery approaches, it is vital. to better understand application use, as well as information such as versioning, resource consumption and application user experience. This whitepaper defines three major lifecycle stages—analysis, user experience baselining and operationalization―each of which is composed of several crucial steps. The paper also provides practical use examples that will help you create and execute an application-lifecycle methodology using Stratusphere UX from Liquidware.